Dodrantal

exphautaz:

simonalkenmayer:

exphautaz:

simonalkenmayer:

simonalkenmayer:

1. ADJ. Of precisely nine inches in length.

2. N. Slang. Denoting someone who claims or might claim to have a nine inch…eh…member, but who is clearly either fibbing in order to impress, or who has not proven his…prowess, by showing it off. Similar in usage to the modern adaptation of calling a particularly odious male a “dick”.

Example: 

1. “The bit of string was dodrantal.”
2. “What a drunk dodrantal. Someone toss him on his arse before he drops his britches.” or “Don’t listen to that braggart. He’s a dodrantal if ever there was one.”

The secondary usage was one specifically unique to the docks of the late sixteen hundreds. Particularly in the pubs in and around the Cranes, or the bear pits across the Thames in Southwark. 

I should discuss the reason it became used in the secondary way, despite the obvious reference to…eh…length, which inevitably turns human minds to thoughts of measuring their sexual organs (someone please explain this to me because I find it absurd).

So let’s look at the original term, and then why the adaptation, shall we?

Dodrantal comes from the Latin word dodrans, which was a term of measurement denoting what we in English commonly refer to as a hyphenated contraction: two-thirds, three-fifths, etcetera. It was also a coin, which was three quarters of another coinage value. Anyway, the point is that nine inches is three-quarters of a foot. And so, the word dodrantal was born.

However, false etymologies make for excellent puns, and as you know, I’m rather partial to puns. In the Scotch, Irish and Welsh Gaelic, “dod” or “daud” has a meaning varying from “sullen, sulking, angry” to “glob or large lump”. And “rant” as you know, means “to talk loudly and longly on a topic, to expound” but in those days, it actually meant something similar to the word “rave”, except that it denoted a kind of hysterical joy or overly humorous and boisterous demeanor.

So you see… A man who talks about the length of his cock is really a sullen, man raving about his lump.

Now you can swear like a 17th century dock worker from Ireland.

I’ve edited it

“or the bear pits

“  I’m sorry?

Bear baiting, cock fighting, that sort of thing. It was a pastime of the period. I would have included cock-fighting, but given the subject matter of the term, I thought it best to avoid the confusion.

I think i’m gonna need to remember bear-fighting as common pass-time.

It wasn’t bear fighting. It was bear baiting. Read about it. It was positively horrifying as a practice. It often involved a bear being trapped and chained while it was attacked by hungry dogs, poked with sticks, singed with torches. The point was to see what the bear could withstand and what would happen when it became enraged.

Dodrantal

exphautaz:

simonalkenmayer:

simonalkenmayer:

1. ADJ. Of precisely nine inches in length.

2. N. Slang. Denoting someone who claims or might claim to have a nine inch…eh…member, but who is clearly either fibbing in order to impress, or who has not proven his…prowess, by showing it off. Similar in usage to the modern adaptation of calling a particularly odious male a “dick”.

Example: 

1. “The bit of string was dodrantal.”
2. “What a drunk dodrantal. Someone toss him on his arse before he drops his britches.” or “Don’t listen to that braggart. He’s a dodrantal if ever there was one.”

The secondary usage was one specifically unique to the docks of the late sixteen hundreds. Particularly in the pubs in and around the Cranes, or the bear pits across the Thames in Southwark. 

I should discuss the reason it became used in the secondary way, despite the obvious reference to…eh…length, which inevitably turns human minds to thoughts of measuring their sexual organs (someone please explain this to me because I find it absurd).

So let’s look at the original term, and then why the adaptation, shall we?

Dodrantal comes from the Latin word dodrans, which was a term of measurement denoting what we in English commonly refer to as a hyphenated contraction: two-thirds, three-fifths, etcetera. It was also a coin, which was three quarters of another coinage value. Anyway, the point is that nine inches is three-quarters of a foot. And so, the word dodrantal was born.

However, false etymologies make for excellent puns, and as you know, I’m rather partial to puns. In the Scotch, Irish and Welsh Gaelic, “dod” or “daud” has a meaning varying from “sullen, sulking, angry” to “glob or large lump”. And “rant” as you know, means “to talk loudly and longly on a topic, to expound” but in those days, it actually meant something similar to the word “rave”, except that it denoted a kind of hysterical joy or overly humorous and boisterous demeanor.

So you see… A man who talks about the length of his cock is really a sullen, man raving about his lump.

Now you can swear like a 17th century dock worker from Ireland.

I’ve edited it

“or the bear pits

“  I’m sorry?

Bear baiting, cock fighting, that sort of thing. It was a pastime of the period. I would have included cock-fighting, but given the subject matter of the term, I thought it best to avoid the confusion.

The Challenge:
I am going to spin an online random food ingredient generator several times. You may select whichever set of ingredients you find easiest to work with. You must then create a dish containing all of the ingredients. Anyone may enter. You do not have to be a reader of mine to participate, though I do hope you will hang around.

The Rules:

  1. All entries must be a reblog of this original post
  2. All entries must include a written recipe so that it can be recreated
  3. All entries must include a picture of the results
  4. All entries must indicate which ingredient list they are using by the number given them in this post.
  5. You may use whatever additional ingredients you wish, but each entry must contain all four items in one of the following lists.
  6. You may use whatever cooking styles, culinary traditions, appliances or implements you wish.

The Deadline:

All entries are due by the last day of June 2018

The Winner:

I will send out a voting post on the last day of June which contains links to all the recipes. Voters will be allowed to choose a numbered recipe from that list (no name will be attached at the time) and register their vote vie a comment on the post.

The Prize:

  • $30 Gift card to a food related website
  • A kitchen implement of my choosing
  • Proper kitchen attire (What do I mean? It’s a surprise)
  • A copy of my cookbook, but only if you’d like it. If not, I’ll think of something else to throw at you of a similar value.

The Ingredients:

These are your four sets of ingredients. You must choose only one list and your submission must contain every item on it (which must be reflected in the recipe you write), in addition to whatever extra things you add to create your dish. If you have a health concern (all lists contain something you cannot eat) then contact me directly, and we will generate another random item to use in place of the one you are casting out. 

  1. Brown rice, bacon, chili peppers, pineapple
  2. molasses, coconut, creme fraiche, marsala
  3. Yogurt, bread crumbs, brussels sprouts, lemon
  4. Spaghetti squash, balsamic vinegar, dates, pork 

Happy cooking!

Recipe Challenge?

simonalkenmayer:

simonalkenmayer:

I want to have another contest, since the book debuted today. 

Anyone want to have a recipe challenge?

I’m thinking of something like a “chopped” challenge.

As in, I give you an ingredient that is easily obtained, or two, or possibly three…

And you send me your recipes and the results of your cooking, and we vote on them…This would be a long term contest, perhaps all month?

What say you? 

Bloody hell…there are actual random ingredient generators on the internet.

Alright, let me put the post together.

Dodrantal

simonalkenmayer:

1. ADJ. Of precisely nine inches in length.

2. N. Slang. Denoting someone who claims or might claim to have a nine inch…eh…member, but who is clearly either fibbing in order to impress, or who has not proven his…prowess, by showing it off. Similar in usage to the modern adaptation of calling a particularly odious male a “dick”.

Example: 

1. “The bit of string was dodrantal.”
2. “What a drunk dodrantal. Someone toss him on his arse before he drops his britches.” or “Don’t listen to that braggart. He’s a dodrantal if ever there was one.”

The secondary usage was one specifically unique to the docks of the late sixteen hundreds. Particularly in the pubs in and around the Cranes, or the bear pits across the Thames in Southwark. 

I should discuss the reason it became used in the secondary way, despite the obvious reference to…eh…length, which inevitably turns human minds to thoughts of measuring their sexual organs (someone please explain this to me because I find it absurd).

So let’s look at the original term, and then why the adaptation, shall we?

Dodrantal comes from the Latin word dodrans, which was a term of measurement denoting what we in English commonly refer to as a hyphenated contraction: two-thirds, three-fifths, etcetera. It was also a coin, which was three quarters of another coinage value. Anyway, the point is that nine inches is three-quarters of a foot. And so, the word dodrantal was born.

However, false etymologies make for excellent puns, and as you know, I’m rather partial to puns. In the Scotch, Irish and Welsh Gaelic, “dod” or “daud” has a meaning varying from “sullen, sulking, angry” to “glob or large lump”. And “rant” as you know, means “to talk loudly and longly on a topic, to expound” but in those days, it actually meant something similar to the word “rave”, except that it denoted a kind of hysterical joy or overly humorous and boisterous demeanor.

So you see… A man who talks about the length of his cock is really a sullen, man raving about his lump.

Now you can swear like a 17th century dock worker from Ireland.

I’ve edited it

Recipe Challenge?

simonalkenmayer:

I want to have another contest, since the book debuted today. 

Anyone want to have a recipe challenge?

I’m thinking of something like a “chopped” challenge.

As in, I give you an ingredient that is easily obtained, or two, or possibly three…

And you send me your recipes and the results of your cooking, and we vote on them…This would be a long term contest, perhaps all month?

What say you?